MxMo CVIII – The Swizzle

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

Le Bois Lele

Le Bois Lele

It’s Mixology Monday!  This Month, our host Frederic of the CocktailVirgin blog, has revived the Swizzle.  Yes, the Swizzle is a drink, not just a stick!  When ice found its way to the Caribbean in the 19th Century, it quickly found a home in cocktails.  No longer did one have to endure the hot weather with warm punch.  For the Swizzle, the ice was shaved or finely crushed into the drink and the whole thing stirred with a Le Bois Lele – the original swizzle stick.  The Le Bois Lele is from a bush that has stems with 4 or 5 branches that come off at a 90º angle.  By rubbing the Le Bois Lele between the palms like a Boy Scout starting a fire, the drink is stirred and frothed into a frosty libation.  There are various types of Swizzles, but basically it’s the technique more than the ingredients.  The base spirits used in the 19th Century depended on the location, but were generally rum or gin.  The drinks themselves are usually sours.

For this Month’s Mixology Monday, we are offering 2 Swizzles: The Southtown Swizzle and the Tepache Swizzle.  I’ll start with the Southtown Swizzle.

Southtown SwizzleSouthtown Swizzle

This cocktail is named after San Antonio’s Southtown, which is an area just south of Downtown, the River Walk and the Alamo.  It is home to historic neighborhoods, an up and coming arts district and a busy culinary scene.  Located in Southtown is the Dorcol Distillery.  There they produce an amazing rakia and, more recently, beer.  They also have a bar from which they serve very innovative and delicious cocktails.

The Southtown Swizzle is all about Dorcol’s bone dry apricot Kinsman Rakia.  The citrus, in this case orange and lime, brightens the party while the Chartreuse adds a touch of herbs.  The Angostura finishes with a little complexity.

  • 2 oz. Kinsman Rakia
  • 1 oz. Orange juice
  • 1 oz. Lime juice
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. Chartreuse
  • Angostura Bitters
  1. Combine everything but the bitters in a Collins glass and add enough crushed or shaved ice to fill the glass 2/3’s
  2. Swizzle with a swizzle stick or spoon until the glass is frosted
  3. Add more ice to fill and continue swizzling until the drink is frothy and the glass is frosted or you get tired
  4. Garnish with several dashes of Angostura on top

Tepache SwizzleTepache Swizzle

I really like Tepache!  That funky pineapple cider – esc concoction.  We prefer this recipe from Victor Tango’s.  It fits perfectly with the concept of the Swizzle.  For this cocktail I used Genevere, lime and Allspice Dram.  The flavors combine to whisk you to the Islands with the first sip.

  • 2 oz. Genevere – I used Bols
  • 1 oz. Tepache
  • 1 oz. Lime juice
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. Allspice Dram
  • Angostura Bitters
  1. Combine everything but the bitters in a Collins glass and add enough crushed or shaved ice to fill the glass 2/3’s
  2. Swizzle with a swizzle stick or spoon until the glass is frosted
  3. Add more ice to fill and continue swizzling until the drink is frothy and the glass is frosted or you get tired
  4. Garnish with several dashes of Angostura on top.

Cheers!


 




Hemingway Deconstructed

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

This Month’s Mixology Monday is upon us and the theme is “Standoffish.”  Brought to us by the folks at Booze Nerds, the idea is to add an ingredient to a cocktail that is not included with the main ingredients and is not a garnish.  At the same time, this ingredient needs to add something to the final drink.  Well, we love foams and foams can fill these requirements!  We have two cocktails to offer, but before I get to them, I want to ramble on about foams for a moment!

I generally limit the foaming ingredient, ( the surfactant), to egg whites.  Gel sheets produce a prettier and more stable foam, but they take a little more effort than I usually wish to invest.  Egg whites are quick, stable enough and reliable.  I also generally use pasteurized egg whites for our foams.  I think that they are better for this application than are fresh egg whites.

The foams I make are from one of two ratios:

  • 2 egg whites: 6 oz. of liquid
  • 3 egg whites: 5 oz. of liquid

The 3:5 ratio produces a creamier and, therefore, thinner foam.  While the 2:6 ratio creates a light and fluffy foam.  For these cocktails, I used the 2:6 ratio for the daiquiri and the 3:5 for the shooters.

Now, on with the drinks!  We have chosen a seasonally appropriate shooter that can either be a cocktail or an appetizer and is easily adjusted to accommodate the non-drinkers in the crowd.  The other probably reflects my wish to either hold onto summer or to head for the Islands!

The Hemingway Deconstructed

Hemingway Deconstructed s

 

This cocktail is our Z Daiquiri, which is along the lines of a Hemingway, but without the grapefruit juice.  So we simply incorporate the grapefruit juice in the foam.  The foam is tart and a touch bitter.  It combines very nicely with the not too sweet daiquiri.  While on the the topic of sweetness, you may want to adjust the amount of simple syrup based on the tartness of your lime juice.

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. good aged rum
  • ¼ oz. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
  • 2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1 oz. simple syrup
  • Hemingway foam – see below

Directions:

  1. Chill a martini glass with ice and water.
  2. While the glass chills, combine all of the ingredients, except the foam, in a shaker.
  3. Shake with ice until shaker is fully frosted: 10 – 15 seconds
  4. Strain into the chilled martini glass.
  5. Carefully float the foam from your iSi whipper and serve immediately

Hemingway Foam

  • 2 egg whites (3 oz. pasteurized egg whites) lightly beaten
  • 2 oz. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
  • 4 oz. Fresh grapefruit juice – double strained
  • 2 Dashes Bitter Truth Grapefruit Bitters
  1. Add all ingredients to an iSi Whipper
  2. Seal the whipper and shake to further break up the egg whites
  3. Double charge the Whipper with N2O, shaking after each charge
  4. Refrigerate for 2 hours before use.  Will keep refrigerated for a few days.

Pumpkin Bisque Shooters

Pumkin Bisque Shooters

First, a big “Thank You” to Booze Nerds because without this MxMo, I might not have thought to add the Applejack foam to these!  I love pumpkin and I’ve always been a fan of pumpkin bisque.  I like mine to be savory.  Save the sweet for the pie!  Since I have a more than passing infatuation with rum, I simply looked to combine two of my favorite flavors.  I tried this warm, with bourbon and with dark rum.  Not great in any combination.  Cold bisque and gold rum were the perfect match.  The bitter sweet flavor of the apple brandy foam is perfect with the savory, slightly spicy pumpkin bisque.

For 2 Shooters:

  • 2 oz. Cold Pumpkin Bisque – see below
  • 1/2 oz. Gold rum such as Cruzan or Mount Gay
  • 1 dash Simple syrup
  • 1 Dash Angostura Bitters
  • Apple Brandy Foam – see below
  1. Combine pumpkin bisque,rum simple syrup and bitters in a mixing glass without ice and stir to combine.
  2. Divide between 2 tall shooters
  3. Gently float the Apple Brandy Foam on the shooters
  4. Serve immediately

Apple Brandy Foam

  • 3 egg whites (4 1/2 oz pasteurized egg whites)
  • 3 oz. Applejack Brandy
  • 2 oz. Fresh Orange juice – double strained
  • 2 Dashes Bar Keep Apple Bitters

 

  1. Add all ingredients to an iSi Whipper
  2. Seal the whipper and shake to further break up the egg whites
  3. Double charge the Whipper with N2O, shaking after each charge
  4. Refrigerate for 2 hours before use.  Will keep refrigerated for a few days.

Pumpkin BisquePumkin Bisque Shooters 2

  • 1 tsp Cayenne
  • 2 Cups Diced Onion
  • 2 cloves Chopped Garlic
  • 1 1/2 Tbls. Butter
  • 1 – 15 oz. Can Pumpkin Puree
  • 4 Cups Chicken Stock
  • 1/4 tsp. Ground Allspice
  • 1/2 tsp Fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. Salt to Taste
  • 1/4 Cup Dry Sherry
  • 1 Cup Heavy Cream
  1. Saute the onions in the butter until translucent – about 3 minutes.  Add the garlic and cook 30 sec.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients except the cream and simmer for 30 min
  3. Place the mixture in a blender and puree until smooth.
  4. Return the puree to the pot, add the cream and continue to cook until heated through.
  5. Serve immediately or cool for the above shooters.

Cheers!


 

 

 

 




Tepache!

Tepache is pineapple, top removed, chunked, unpeeled, juiced, then mixed with a few spices and sugar and allowed to ferment, uncovered, first at room temperature and then in the refrigerator, with whatever is in the air, for one week.  If pineapple juice and hard cider had a baby – it would be tepache.  This favorite street drink of Mexico is tropical and slightly pungent with a little funk.  Traditionally served alone or with Mexican beer, tepache is making its way onto cocktail menus all over the US.

It first came to my attention when I read a Bon Appétit post last Summer.  Then this past July, I spotted an article about a DIY tepache in Imbibe .  When I noticed that the recipe was from our friends at Victor Tangos, my curiosity was truly peaked.  Victor Tangos is one of the restaurants I try to visit when we’re in Dallas.  So, I absolutely had to head over there at my first opportunity.

victor-tangosWhen I had a chance to discuss Victor Tangos’ version with Manager Matt Ragan, he said their tepache is basically just the way Bartender Alejandro Galindo’s mother used to make hers.  According to Matt, they make their tepache in the restaurant and there is little, if any, variation between batches.  They have used it in several cocktails, mainly Tiki drinks, substituting tepache for pineapple juice.  During my visit a few weeks ago, they were offering the Tomar de los Muertes, which eschews the rum and combines mezcal and tequila.  Matt says that the tepache cocktails have been well received and will continue on the menu for awhile.

I used Alejandro’s recipe, which is simple and came out very similar to what I had at Victor Tangos.  It was good at the end of the seven days proscribed in the recipe, but got better when allowed to ferment another ten days.  You don’t have to make your own – just ask at your favorite liquor store. We tried it alone, with beer and in a few different cocktails.  I found that the cocktails are best if the amount of tepache is equal to, or less than, the volume of hard spirit.  Otherwise, it overwhelms the drink.  We settled on 3 favorites: a Tiki variation, a tequila/amaro combination and a gin cocktail.

The Potted Tepache Parrot

This is a riff on Trader Vic’s Potted Parrot using tepache rather than orange juice.  I also increased the orgeat.  The flavors of the ingredients all come through: the rum, the tart/funky tepache, the orgeat and a hint of lemon.  Here’s the recipe:Potted Tepache Parrot

  • 2 oz. Cruzan white rum
  • 2 oz. tepache
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • 1/2 oz. curacao
  • 1/4 oz. simple syrup
  • 1/2 oz. orgeat
  • 12 oz. crushed ice
  1. Chill a Double Old Fashioned glass with ice and water
  2. Shake all ingredients with crushed ice
  3. Pour unstrained into chilled  glass

Next up is:

The Tepache Tease

The bright flavor of the tequila adds to the tropical pineapple while the plum/cherry notes in the Bonal plays with the pungency of the tepache.

Tepache Tease

  • 2 oz. Tepache
  • 2 oz. Plata Tequila such as Milagro
  • 1/4 oz. Bonal
  • 1 dash 2:1 simple syrup
  1. Chill a Double Old Fashioned with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice and shake to chill
  3. Strain over fresh ice in chilled glass

 

 

And finally:

The Tepache Cocktail

This proves you can have an elegant cocktail that uses pineapple!  Tepache Cocktail

  • 1 oz. Plymouth Gin
  • 3/4 oz. Tepache
  • 1/4 oz. Lemon Juice
  • 1 dash (1/8 tsp) 2:1 simple syrup
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice and shake to chill
  3. Strain into chilled glass and serve

Cheers!


 




Paradise Remembered

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

It is Mixology Monday!  The theme, “Drink of Shame,”  is the invention of our host Tipicular Fixins.  We have all quaffed a few sweet, strange libations and I have imbibed my share of questionable drinks. This Month’s challenge, (now that we are real mixologists), is to create a cocktail  that elevates a drink from our misadventurous youth onto a higher plain.    I thought of resurrecting Trash Can Punch like some Frankenstein concoction, but instead I have chosen the Pina Colada.

Paradise Remembered CloseupWhen I was young, I spent a lot of time diving.  I would travel to islands and points south of Mexico known primarily for beautiful beaches, clear waters and unreliable postal service.  I would order a Pina Colada at practically every bar I entered.  These were occasionally amazing, but primarily consisted of some white liquid along with an unknown rum – all whirred with ice and usually sticky sweet.  I don’t remember ever ordering one in the US.

The cocktail I created, the Paradise Remembered, keeps the flavors of rum, coconut and pineapple, but I made it as a sour.  I used Kalani Coconut Liqueur, Cruzan Dark Aged Rum, fresh pineapple juice and Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur.  The result is much lighter than a Pina Colada.  The flavors are coconut and rum with the pineapple completing the combination.  The egg yolk contributes that silky mouth feel along with the appealingly luxurious, thick foam floating on top.

 Paradise Remembered

  • 1 1/2 Oz. Kalani Coconut Liqueur
  • 3/4 Oz. Cruzan Dark Aged Rum
  • 1 oz. Fresh Pineapple Juice
  • 1/2 Oz. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
  • 1 egg yolk
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients in a shaker and shake without ice for 30 seconds
  3. Add Ice and shake until chilled 10 – 15 seconds
  4. Double strain into chilled cocktail glass.

Cheers!




National Create a Vacuum Day!

shaker-girlFebruary 4 is National Create a Vacuum Day.  So, in cocktalian fashion, you need to create a vacuum today!  Ever wonder why your cocktail shaker is so hard to open after you’ve shaken your drink?  As you shake your drink with ice, the liquid and air in the shaker cool and contract – causing a vacuum to form.  This is what holds the shaker together and makes it hard to open.

Thus, you can make your very own vacuum.  Now try out a daiquiri, margarita, sour or something new, and SHAKE IT UP, BABY!!!  Here are a few suggestions:

The Z

The Z

The Z

This is one of our favorite daiquiris.  Simple, fresh ingredients and you can feel the warmth of the sun and the sounds of the surf!  Hemingway, here we come.

Get the recipe here

Ten Four

Ten Four

Ten Four

Combine fresh cinlantro and jalapeno with the magic of Chartreuse and Cinco Vodka.  Need a little Grover Washington to go with that?

Get the recipe here

 

The Mayahuel

mayahuel_codex_rios

The Mayahuel

Mayahuel was the Aztec Goddess of the maguey of which the agave is a type.  She was the mother of the “400 rabbit” gods of drunkenness.  This margarita plays on the agave with tequila, agave orange liqueur, and agave nectar.

Get the recipe here

Whiskey Sour

Belle Meade Sour

Belle Meade Sour

Smooth, vanilla, caramel, smoke and all of the other wonders of bourbon combined with sweet/tart lemon.  Now we’re talking!

Get the recipe here

 

 

 

So, honor the day and create a few vacuums!

Cheers!




Key Lime “O”

This should be served flaming.  Either double the recipe and serve in a scorpion bowl, or float an inverted lime half with 151 rum soaked piece of bread.  You can sub the Key Lime Bitters with orange bitters.

Key Lime 'O'

Key Lime ‘O’

  1. Shake all ingredients with crushed ice
  2. Pour unstrained into tall glass



Blue Hawaii

The first “Blue Drink.”  Invented  in 1957 by Harry Yee of the Hilton Hawaiian Village.  It was an instant hit and, yes, the movie was named for the drink!

Blue Hawaii

Blue Hawaii

  • 1 ½ oz. vodka
  • 2 oz. pineapple juice
  • ¾ oz. lemon juice
  • ¾ oz. blue curacao
  • ¼ oz. simple syrup
  • ½ t. cream
  1. Shake with crushed ice
  2. Pour unstrained into tall glass
  3. Garnish with fruit stick



Hawaiian Eye

Created at the bar in Burbank where the show’s actors hung out after filming.Hawaiian Eye

  • 1 oz. Gold Rum
  • ½ oz. Light Rum
  • ½ oz. lime juice
  • ½ oz. Falernum
  • ½ oz. simple syrup
  • 8 oz. crushed ice
  1. Blend for 5 sec.
  2. Pour unstrained into glass
  3. Garnish with cherry and lime



Jungle Bird

From the Kuala Lumpur Hilton.Jungle Bird

  • 1 ½ oz. dark Jamaican Rum (such as Appleton)
  • ¾ oz. Campari
  • 4 oz. pineapple juice
  • ½ oz. Lime juice
  • ½ oz. simple syrup
  1. Chill an old fashioned glass with ice and water
  2. While the glass chills, combine all of the ingredients in a shaker.
  3. Shake with ice until shaker is fully frosted: 10 – 15 seconds
  4. Pour unstrained into chilled glass
  5. Garnish with a cherry and lemon and orange wheels



Mai Tai

This is Trader Vic’s original recipe.Mai Tai

  • 1 oz. Appleton Extra
  • 1 oz. Mount Gay Gold Rum
  • ½ oz. Curacao
  • 1 oz. Lime Juice
  • ¼ oz. orgeat
  • ¼ oz. simple syrup
  1. Shake all ingredients with crushed ice
  2. Pour unstrained into old fashioned glass
  3. Add crushed ice to fill
  4. Garnish with a mint sprig