Plymouth Old Fashioned

Plymouth Old Fashioned

I really like bitters forward old fashioneds.  To me, bitters bring flavor and spice that you aren’t going to find elsewhere.  One way to get a lot of bitters into a cocktail without making it, well, too bitter, is to make a syrup with bitters as all or part of the liquid.  For this drink I have chosen Applejack, brown sugar and black walnut bitters to use in the syrup.  It is then combined with calvados, bourbon and rum.

This is a big drink in size, strength and flavor.  The taste of apple blends with the vanilla and spice from the rum and the combined smoky notes of the rum and bourbon.  The black walnut bitters really stand out.  I initially used Fees Brothers Aztec Chocolate Bitters, but I think that Angostura Bitters with the Fees Brothers Black Walnut Bitters and Orange Bitters is better.

You can easily lighten up this drink by substituting Cruzan Dark Aged Rum for the Zaya and/or Russell’s 10 year old Bourbon for the Basil Hayden’s.

Here is the recipe:

  • 1 oz. Calvados
  • 1 oz. Aged rum such as Zaya 12 Year Old
  • 1 oz. Aged bourbon such as Basil Hayden’s
  • 1 oz. Black Walnut Syrup (See below)
  • 1 bar spoon honey syrup (1 part honey dissolved in 1 part water)
  • 2 dashes Fees Brothers Black Walnut Bitters
  • 2 dashes Fees Brothers Orange Bitters
  • 2 dashes Fees Brothers Aztec Bitters or Angostura Bitters
  • Thick orange peel for garnish
  1. Stir all ingredients, except the garnish, in a mixing glass with ice.
  2. Strain into a chilled old fashioned glass with fresh ice – preferably a single large cube or sphere
  3. Express the orange oils over the drink and float the peel.

Black Walnut Syrup

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 oz. Applejack
  • 1 oz. Fees Brothers Black Walnut Bitters
  1. In a small sauce pan over medium heat, dissolve the sugar in the liquid, stirring frequently.  Or you can put all of the ingredients in a blender and run on high for a few minutes.
  2. Allow to cool
  3. It will keep longer if you filter it through a metal coffee filter to remove any undissolved sugar crystals.
  4. Will keep in the refrigerator for a few weeks

Cheers!





John Dandy

John DandyBourbon goes with many things, but apples, cinnamon and chocolate top my pairings list.   For the bourbon in this cocktail, I used Ranger Creek’s .36 Texas Straight Bourbon Whiskey which gently nips but doesn’t bite.  It brings the flavors of vanilla, cinnamon and a touch of oak.  If you choose a different bourbon, I suggest something that isn’t overly smooth.  I used Bigallet China-China Amer as a modifier.  Alone, this liqueur tastes of bitter orange, citrus, and cherries with an earthy, root touch similar to cola, (think bourbon and coke).  I added the bitters for complexity and to introduce chocolate, additional cinnamon and a bit of dried fruit from the fig bitters.


John Dandy

The nose of this Manhattan-esque cocktail is bright orange, fruit, vanilla and cinnamon.  The initial flavors are apple, vanilla with a touch of oak, followed by chocolate, dried fruit and a bit of spice.  The earthy tone comes late and the finish is fruit, spice, cinnamon and vanilla.  As noted below, don’t get this cocktail too sweet.John Dandy2

  • 1 oz. Bourbon
  • 1 oz. Laird’s Applejack
  • 1/4 oz. Bigallet China-China Amer
  • 1-2 dashes 2:1 Demerara simple syrup – depending on the sweetness of your maraschino cherries
  • 1 dash Fees Brothers Aztec Chocolate Bitters
  • 1 dash Brooklyn Hemispherical Black Mission Fig Bitters
  • Orange peel for garnish
  • Maraschino cherry for garnish
  1. Chill a coup or other stemmed cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all of the ingredients except the garnishes in a mixing glass with ice
  3. Stir to chill and strain into chilled glass
  4. Express orange peel and discard
  5. Add cherry

Cheers!


 




Slán

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

Slán, in Gaelic, roughly translates to “goodby”.  That is the theme for this Month’s Mixology Monday.  It’s over.  It’s done.  Kaput.  So now is goodby to the World’s Best Online Cocktail Party. Hosted by our leader and fearless cat herder, Frederic Yarm of the Cocktail Virgin Slut blog, the actual theme for the final Mixology Monday is the Irish Wake.  A most appropriate way to say, “Slán”

Wow! Mixology Monday I, April, 2006.  Almost 11 years ago.  Back then, you probably had a Motorola RAZR with 5 MB of memory and a VGA camera.  Trendy people had a Nokia Chocolate.  Or, if you were into taking pictures, you might have had a Sony Erickson with a whopping 3.0 megapixel camera!  You listened to music on your iPod but there were no iPhones.  No. 9 Park, Milk & Honey, Employees Only and Bourbon & Branch were cranking out the cocktails we love, but they weren’t using St. Germain.  It would be a year before that was introduced.  How things change.

SlantIt would be interesting to know how many cocktails were posted and how many individuals participated in the 115 Mixology Mondays since April, 2006.  I’ve participated for only a little over 2 years.  I’ve always looked forward to it and had the privilege of hosting twice.  I will miss Mixology Monday.

For me, toasting to someone’s memory calls for a shot. Unfortunately, I have raised a glass for several family members and friends that left us.  Some were far too young.  The one Mixology Monday I missed over the past two years was when a close friend died and I wasn’t feeling too creative.  But an essential part of a wake is to celebrate the life that’s ended.

I find that creating a new shot is a bit difficult.  While you can sip a shot, they are by nature made to be downed quickly.  This means that you’re not going to savor the flavors.  So subtlety is out the window.  Plus, shots are generally not served cold.  This means that sweet, sour and salt are dramatically different.

I usually try not to get too esoteric or or use a bunch of ingredients in my cocktails.  This time I’ve done both.  The Slán combines Irish whiskey, fernet, blood orange liqueur, Pineau des Charentes and Punt e Mes infused with coffee and roasted cocoa nibs.  The infusion only took an hour, but it does need to be made in advance.  When you offer someone a shot, it matters how much effort you put into its preparation.

Slán

All of these ingredients are very good as stand alone drinks.  I think that Jameson has developed some really amazing whiskeys and their Black Barrel is one of the best.  The Luxardo Fernet is one of my favorites.  It is a touch sweeter than most.  I had to mess with the Punt e Mes adding coffee and a touch of chocolate.  I’ve only recently started using Solerno, but I’m intrigued with the blood orange.  The Penau des Charence adds a touch of sweetness and richness from the cognac.

Even though this is a shot and goes down quickly, there is a lot going on.  The nose is Irish Whiskey, with the distinct caramel and malt of the Black Barrel, there is also vanilla and herbs.  The taste is caramel and toffee from the Jameson with sweetness from the Penau with a background of bitterness from the Punt e Mes and the Fernet.  There is also coffee, orange and touch of woodiness from the Jameson and the Fernet, especially on the finish.  Here’s the recipe:

  • 1 1/2 oz. Jameson Black Barrel Irish Whiskey
  • 1/4 oz. Coffee & Roasted Cocoa Nib Infused Punt e Mes – see below
  • 1/4 oz. Penau des Charence
  • 1/8 oz. Luxardo Fernet
  • 1/8 oz. Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur
  1. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with 1 or 2 ice cubes.
  2. Stir to chill slightly
  3. Strain into 2 shot glasses

Punt e Mes Infused with Coffee and Roasted Cocoa Nibs

  • 250 ml (8 oz) Punt e Mes plus more for diluting
  • 30 gm Cracked Black Coffee Beans
  • 3 Tbl Cocoa Nibs
  1. Heat the oven to 325
  2. Line a sheet pan with aluminum foil and scatter the cocoa nibs across the pan.
  3. Roast in the oven until they smell like fresh brownies – about 10 min
  4. Crack the peppercorns in a mortar and pestle or a baggie and rolling pin
  5. In a lidded glass jar, combine all of the ingredients and allow to infuse for 1 hr.
  6. Strain through a metal coffee filter and then through a paper coffee filter
  7. Taste and dilute with additional Punt e Mes to taste.  I added an additional 1/2 by volume.
  8. Keeps refrigerated for a few weeks.

So here is to all of those who followed or contributed to this and all of the Mixology Mondays past:

CheersMay the road rise up to meet you, and the wind be at your back.

May the best of your past be the worst of your future.

Sláinte!




MxMo CXIV – Digestifs

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

I love bitter!  So, naturally, I love this theme! I think the amari and other digestifs add an amazing complexity to any style of cocktail, (well, I haven’t tried it with Tiki drinks – yet!)  This month we have two cocktails to offer.  We obviously have the Holidays in mind as these are both rich and creamy drinks!


Danny Boy

Danny BoyThis is a rich, bittersweet version of an Irish coffee.  I’ve used coffee syrup, which is easy to make and works much better than hot brewed coffee in cold cocktails.  The flavors are coffee first with a background of bittersweet and a creamy texture.

  • 2 oz. Cold brewed coffee syrup – see below
  • 1 oz Irish whiskey – I used Tullamore Dew Special Reserve 12 yr.
  • 1 oz. Licor 43
  • 1/2 oz Montenegro
  • 1/2 oz 2:1 Simple syrup
  • 1/2 oz Cream
  • Coffee beans for garnish
  1. Chill a large Coup with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients, except garnish, in a cocktail shaker with ice
  3. Shake to chill
  4. Double strain into chilled glass
  5. Allow the foam to rise to the top for 15-20 seconds then carefully drop three coffee beans on top for garnish

Coffee Amaro Flip

Bittersweet Coffee FlipI think that Flips, in all of their forms, are an interesting type of cocktail.  This drink is kind of a grownup eggnog – rich and creamy but not cloyingly sweet, with a bittersweet component which creates an intricate cocktail that speaks rum, coffee and the deep, earthy flavors of Amaro Nino.

  • 2 oz White rum – I used Treaty Oak
  • 1 oz. Amaro Nino
  • 3/4 oz Cream
  • 1/2 oz 2:1 Simple Syrup
  • 1/2 oz Coffee Liqueur – I used Starbucks
  • 1 Lg Egg
  1. Chill a large Coup with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients in a shaker without ice and dry shake for 30 seconds (Make 4 of these and you can have an extra slice of pie!)
  3. Add ice to the shaker and shake to chill
  4. Double strain into chilled glass
  5. Allow the foam to rise to the top for 15-20 seconds then grate a little nutmeg on the top.

Cold Brewed Coffee Syrup

Making a cold syrup concentrates the flavors of the coffee.  Definitely use a coffee you like to drink!  We use a dark roast from Starbucks.

  • 3 1/2 cups coarsely ground coffee
  • 5 cups water
  1. Combine coffee and water in a container stir well and let sit for 12 hours at room temperature.
  2. Strain, first through a fine mesh filter, then through a paper filter
  3. Keeps refrigerated for 1-2 weeks

Cheers!




The Corpse in the Sand (No 2)

Corpse in the Sand

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

It’s already Mixology Monday for October!  This Month we are hosted by Frederic of the  Cocktail Virgin and the theme is “Mashups.”  The challenge is to combine 2 cocktails into one Monster.  I started thinking of Scotch drinks, but nothing seemed to be anything special.  Looking at the Blood and Sand, a cocktail made with equal parts Scotch, Cherry Heering, Sweet Vermouth and Orange Juice, I was reminded of several other equal parts cocktails.  These included the Last Word, the Negroni, the Corpse Reviver,  the Vieux Carré (sort of) and the Blood and Sand.   I played around a bit and settled on “Monster Mashing” the Corpse Reviver (No 2) and the Blood and Sand.blood-and-sand poster

As noted above the Blood and Sand, which was named after the popular movie of 1922, is made with equal parts Scotch, Cherry Heering, Sweet Vermouth and Orange Juice.  The Corpse Reviver (No 2), which dates back to Harry Craddock, is made with equal parts gin, maraschino liqueur, Lillet, and lemon juice with a dash or wash of Chartreuse.  My initial attempt was to use the Blood and Sand recipe and substitute gin for the Scotch and lemon juice for the orange juice.  so the drink was:

  • Gin
  • Cherry Heering
  • Sweet Vermouth
  • Lemon Juice

Corpse in the Sand3This drink was good but was pretty much Cherry Heering with citrus and some other background flavors.  So I decided to use maraschino liqueur rather than the Cherry Heering.  This works very well.  The herbals of the gin and vermouth are allowed to come through, but it’s really just a Corpse Reviver with sweet vermouth instead of Lillet.  So I decided to bring back the Scotch.  I did this with a Scotch wash and a shot back.  Now the Scotch plays along in the background bringing back the Blood and Sand like that other voice in the monster’s head!  Serving the Scotch along on the side re-enforces it’s presence as you enjoy the cocktail.

The Corpse in the Sand (No 2)

  • 3/4 oz. London Dry GinCorpse in the Sand2
  • 3/4 oz. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
  • 3/4 oz. Sweet Vermouth – I used Dolin
  • 3/4 oz. Fresh lemon juice
  • 1 – 1 1/2 oz. Single Malt Scotch – I used Cragganmore a Speyside Scotch.  I wouldn’t suggest anything too peaty or smokey.

Corpse in the Sand4

  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Pour the Scotch into a Shaker tin with enough ice to chill the whole cocktail.  Stir briefly to coat the ice and slightly chill and dilute the Scotch.
  3. Strain the scotch into a whiskey or shot glass and set aside
  4. Add the remaining ingredients to the shaker and shake to chill.
  5. Double strain into the chilled cocktail glass.
  6. Serve the cocktail with the Scotch along side.Corpse in the Sand 5jpg

Cheers!





Cucumber Jalapeño Mule – 3 Ways (or maybe 6 ways!)

Cuc Jalapeno Lime MuleMules, those descendants of the Moscow Mule in all their forms, are becoming more and more popular.  Why?  Because they are a) easy to prepare and b) taste great.  What better cocktail to serve your guests than this popular libation?  Now, you Moscow Mule aficionados out there can rightly complain that all of these erstwhile concoctions containing ginger beer are not Mules.  Just like the Martini was co-opted into many forms, the Mule now has countless varieties.  So all I can say is: “Smile, deal with it and serve your guests delicious drinks!”

These Mules are all based on muddled cucumbers and seeded jalapeños. What changes is the fruit juice and the base spirit.  I started to call these, “South Texas Mules”, since I used either Ranger Creek’s .36 White Whiskey, or Cinco Vodka which are both distilled here in South Texas. You can use either spirit in any of these cocktails.  Each brings its own twist to the party.  I found that I preferred the Whiskey with the cranberry and the Vodka with the pomegranate.

Ranger Creek’s .36 White Whiskey is their ‘White Dog,’ or unaged bourbon.  It is slightly sweet and a bit grainy with a hint of fruit.  It also has the ‘bite’ of white whiskey.  Cinco Vodka has a slight aroma of alcohol, but beneath that is a light, pleasant note of grain. The flavors are mostly neutral, with hints of wheat and some vanilla.

The secret to any cocktail is premium ingredients, but:

The Secret to Great Mules

Rocky MuleWhether you are making a classic Moscow Mule or some variety, the one thing that will take your cocktail over the top is fresh ginger.  This will mean that you cannot build the Mule in a glass or mug, but the added zing makes the effort worthwhile.  The easiest way to use fresh ginger is to purchase frozen crushed ginger at your supermarket. This generally comes in 1 tsp squares.  I cut the frozen square into 4 pieces and use 1 per cocktail.  Alternatively, slice a coin of fresh ginger from a ginger root and crush it with your muddler in your shaking tin.  You don’t even need to peel it first.

You can easily offer all 6 varieties of this Mule at your next party.  Pre-slice the cucumber and ginger.  Stem the jalapeños and split them down the center lengthwise.  They are easy to seed this way.  Then just slice them short wise and use 4 pieces to equal 2 slices.

Cucumber Jalapeño Mule

Let’s start with lime.  This is as close the the classic Moscow Mule as any of these come.  I like both the Whiskey and Vodka versions of this.  This cocktail is ginger forward with a background freshness from the cucumber.  The jalapeño stays behind the scene enhancing the cucumber.Cuc Jalapeno Mule CU

  • 3 – 4 slices of fresh cucumber – I used the English variety
  • 2 slices seeded jalapeño
  • 1 slice Fresh ginger or 1/4 tsp fresh frozen crushed ginger
  • 2 oz. Fresh lime juice
  • 2 oz. White Whiskey or Vodka
  • 1 oz. 2:1 Simple Syrup (2 parts sugar to 1 part water)
  • 6 oz Ginger Beer (I use Goslings or Fever Tree)
  • Slice of lime for garnish
  1. Muddle cucumber, jalapeño and ginger with the lime juice in your shaker tin
  2. Add Spirit of choice and simple syrup.
  3. Fill shaker with ice cubes and shake to chill and further muddle: 20-30 seconds
  4. Double strain into Copper Mug or chilled Collins glass over fresh ice.
  5. Add Ginger Beer and garnish

Cucumber Jalapeño Mule with Cranberry

Cuc Jalapeno Cran MuleAs noted above, I preferred the Whiskey with this, but the Vodka is good too.  The recipe is the same as with the lime juice – just substitute the cranberry juice.  I use an organic, unsweetened brand.  The cocktail is tart with spicy ginger.  The cucumber and cranberry go very well together.  I generally serve Mules in the appropriate copper mug, but I wanted to picture this with the color.  This will make a great Holiday cocktail – bright red and fizzy!

  • 3 – 4 slices of fresh cucumber – I used the English variety
  • 2 slices seeded jalapeño
  • 1 slice Fresh ginger or 1/4 tsp fresh frozen crushed ginger
  • 2 oz. Unsweetened cranberry juice
  • 2 oz. White Whiskey or Vodka (I preferred the White Whiskey)
  • 1 oz. 2:1 Simple Syrup (2 parts sugar to 1 part water)
  • 6 oz Ginger Beer (I use Goslings or Fever Tree)
  1. Muddle cucumber, jalapeño and ginger with the cranberry juice in your shaker tin
  2. Add Spirit of choice and simple syrup.
  3. Fill shaker with ice cubes and shake to chill and further muddle: 20-30 seconds
  4. Double strain into Copper Mug or chilled Collins glass over fresh ice.
  5. Add Ginger Beer

Cucumber Jalapeño Mule with Pomegranate

The pomegranate adds a rich note and is not as tart as either the lime or cranberry varieties above.   I used Pom brand which is unsweetened, but is sweeter than some others I’ve had.  The recipe is a bit different because of the sweetness of the Pom.  You might need to adjust the pomegranate to simple syrup ratio if you use a different brand.

  • 3 – 4 slices of fresh cucumber – I used the English varietyCuc Jalapeno Pom Mule CU
  • 2 slices seeded jalapeño
  • 1 slice Fresh ginger or 1/4 tsp fresh frozen crushed ginger
  • 2 1/2 oz. Unsweetened pomegranate juice
  • 2 oz. White Whiskey or Vodka (I preferred the White Whiskey)
  • 1/2 oz. 2:1 Simple Syrup (2 parts sugar to 1 part water)
  • 6 oz Ginger Beer (I use Goslings or Fever Tree)
  1. Muddle cucumber, jalapeño and ginger with the pomegranate juice in your shaker tin
  2. Add Spirit of choice and simple syrup.
  3. Fill shaker with ice cubes and shake to chill and further muddle: 20-30 seconds
  4. Double strain into Copper Mug or chilled Collins glass over fresh ice.
  5. Add Ginger Beer

So there they are.  These will be a simple way to offer multiple varieties of Mules to your guests.

Cheers!





MxMo CIV

Rusty Nail LgThe theme for this month’s Mixology Monday, brought to us this month by Dagreb of the Nihil Utopia blog, is Forgiving Cocktails, as in a “little too much of this and a touch to little of that.”  The challenge is to submit a cocktail that is tolerant of a bit of sloppiness in its preparation.  This lack of precision is, of course, exactly the opposite of what we generally do for this online cocktail party. While things like Rum and Coke or Jack and Coke came to mind, I decided on the Rusty Nail. In the past, I firmly believed that Scotch should be mixed only with ice or a few drops of water, if that.  This belief also included the doctrine that real Scotch wasn’t blended!  Well, I finally saw the light and discovered that good Scotch can make a great cocktail and that well made blends can make a great Scotch.

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

Sometime back, I posted the Smokin’ Nail.  This is a tea smoked combination of Single Malt Scotch and Drambuie.  I have seen Rusty Nail recipes use anywhere from 4:”1 Scotch:Drambuie to 1:1.  For the Smokin’ Nail, I used 4:1.  Since the exact ratio is variable, you should get a decent cocktail even from an inexperienced bartender.  In addition, you can add bitters and/or a twist of lemon.  Dave Stolte muddles a lemon peel and bitters in an old fashioned glass, and then builds the drink  adding ice, Scotch and Drambuie.  At this year’s Tales of the Cocktail, the folks from Monkey Shoulder were serving up a delicious Rusty Nail.  This is my version of that cocktail:

Rusty Nail

  • 1 1/2 oz. Monkey Shoulder Blended Scotch
  • 3/4 oz. Drambuie
  • 1 dash Dale DeGroff’s Pimento Bitters – optional
  • 1 lemon peel – optional
  1. Chill an Old Fashioned Glass with ice and water
  2. Combine the Scotch, Drambuie and bitters (if using) in a mixing glass with ice and stir to chill
  3. Strain into chilled glass over a large fresh ice cube
  4. Express the lemon peel over the cocktail and discard the peel.

I like adding the bitters.  They decrease the sweetness of the Drambuie without detracting from its flavors.  The lemon peel adds further complexity.

So, a fresh glass, a chunk of ice, some Scotch and a little Drambuie – you’re good to go!!

Cheers!


 

 




Tennessee Chocolate

Tennessee Chocolate BottlesHere I go offering another cocktail crafted with Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey*.  As I’ve written previously, it is single distilled from a mash of corn, barley and wheat which gives it some subtle, but distinct, differences from other premium white whiskeys.  I think Nelson’s Green Brier is slightly sweeter and contains a malt/chocolate note, but still present is the ‘bite’ you would expect from white whiskey.  A lot of recipes try to cover up the ‘bite’ of white whiskey with fruit juices or other sweeteners. I wanted to highlight the hint of chocolate without increasing the sweet.  While I consider this a dessert cocktail, it isn’t cloying and allows the ‘bite’ to add character to the party.  Adding 4-5 drops of Bittermens Mole Bitters will decrease the sweetness and increase the complexity.

Tenessee Chocolate

  • 1 0z. Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey
  • 1 oz. Frangelico
  • 1 oz. Crème de Cocao
  • 1/4 oz. Ancho Reyes
  • Optional 4-5 drops Bitterman’s Mole Bitters
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients to a mixing glass with ice and stir to chill
  3. Strain into chilled glass

Cheers!

* Doc Elliott’s Mixology receives no compensation for brands mentioned.


 




Green Brier Grin

Green Brier GrinI met the Nelson brothers, of Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, at this year’s San Antonio Cocktail Conference and visited with them again at TOTC.  Their Belle Meade Bourbon is one of my favorites and with it I have created a number of cocktails.  I first tasted their Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey* at the San Antonio Cocktail Conference.  It is single distilled from a mash of corn, barley and wheat which gives it some subtle, but distinct differences from other premium white whiskeys.  First, I think Nelson’s Green Brier is slightly sweeter and has a malty/chocolate note.  Still present is the ‘bite’ you would expect from white whiskey.  Previously, I was not a fan of white whiskey, but liking theirs, I have set out to design some cocktails using Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey.

I may have just had chocolate on the brain, or maybe it was molé, but the chocolate note I mentioned made me think of chilies and thus Ancho Reyes liqueur.  Add in Carpano Antica Vermouth and now it becomes something rich and complex.  Being determined to gild the lily, I wanted to push the herbal flavors of the vermouth.  So, I got esoteric and added Bigallet’s China-China Amer.  The Carpano has wonderful essences of dried fruits and bitter marmalade along with a little cocoa and red wine.  All of which are enhanced by the China-China’s orange peels and bittering herbs bringing a little truffle like earthiness to the party.  This combination complements rather than overwhelms or conceals the unique flavors of this white whiskey.  Here’s the recipe that makes me smile!

Green Brier GrinGreen Brier Bottles

  • 1 1/2 oz. Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey
  • 3/4 oz. Carpano Antica
  • 1/2 oz. Ancho Reyes
  • 1/2 oz. Bigallet’s China-China Amer
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Add all ingredients, except the garnish, to a mixing glass with ice.  Stir to chill.
  3. Strain into chilled cocktail glass

Cheers!

* Doc Elliott’s Mixology receives no compensation for brands mentioned.




Hometown Hooch MxMo XCVII

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

It’s time again for the world’s best online cocktail party.  The theme for this month’s Mixology Monday is “Hometown Hooch,”  as set forth by Stuart Putney at Putney Farms.

You can read more at the announcement post here, but the idea is to use locally distilled spirits in a cocktail.  I have chosen Rebecca Creek Distillery for three reasons:

  1. We use their Enchanted Rock Vodka as one of our go to’s
  2. We have a great Old Fashioned using their Texas Whiskey
  3. It’s the only Texas Hill Country distillery that I’ve heard mentioned in a Country song!

 I’m Not Dead Yet (Just Married)

Rebecca CreekThis is a drink we featured at our Daughter’s wedding last year.  It was served at the Groom’s Whiskey and Tequila Bar, along with several other bourbon and tequila libations and hand rolled cigars.

Rebecca Creek Fine Texas Spirit Whiskey is very smooth with a little bite at the finish.  The flavors are primarily barrel notes of vanilla and herbs.  It is composed of young barrel aged Texas whiskey and 8 year old Kentucky Bourbon and comes off similar to a Canadian Blend.  In this cocktail, these flavors back up the Black Mission Fig Bitters and the smokey agave.  Made as a built drink, the initial taste is strong, but as it is sipped and swirled in your hand, the ice melts and the drink cools providing a enjoyably long, slow finish.

Here is the recipe:Rebecca Creek 3

  • 1 1/2 oz. Rebecca Creek Fine Texas Spirit Whiskey
  • 2 droppers full Brooklyn Hemispherical Black Mission Fig Bitters
  • 1/4 oz. Agave syrup
  • Orange peel for garnish
  1. Combine the first 3 ingredients in an unchilled, single Old Fashioned glass and stir
  2. Gently add a large ice cube
  3. Express the oil from the orange peel over the drink and float the peel.

Cheers!