Green Brier Grin

Green Brier GrinI met the Nelson brothers, of Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, at this year’s San Antonio Cocktail Conference and visited with them again at TOTC.  Their Belle Meade Bourbon is one of my favorites and with it I have created a number of cocktails.  I first tasted their Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey* at the San Antonio Cocktail Conference.  It is single distilled from a mash of corn, barley and wheat which gives it some subtle, but distinct differences from other premium white whiskeys.  First, I think Nelson’s Green Brier is slightly sweeter and has a malty/chocolate note.  Still present is the ‘bite’ you would expect from white whiskey.  Previously, I was not a fan of white whiskey, but liking theirs, I have set out to design some cocktails using Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey.

I may have just had chocolate on the brain, or maybe it was molé, but the chocolate note I mentioned made me think of chilies and thus Ancho Reyes liqueur.  Add in Carpano Antica Vermouth and now it becomes something rich and complex.  Being determined to gild the lily, I wanted to push the herbal flavors of the vermouth.  So, I got esoteric and added Bigallet’s China-China Amer.  The Carpano has wonderful essences of dried fruits and bitter marmalade along with a little cocoa and red wine.  All of which are enhanced by the China-China’s orange peels and bittering herbs bringing a little truffle like earthiness to the party.  This combination complements rather than overwhelms or conceals the unique flavors of this white whiskey.  Here’s the recipe that makes me smile!

Green Brier GrinGreen Brier Bottles

  • 1 1/2 oz. Nelson’s Green Brier Tennessee White Whiskey
  • 3/4 oz. Carpano Antica
  • 1/2 oz. Ancho Reyes
  • 1/2 oz. Bigallet’s China-China Amer
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Add all ingredients, except the garnish, to a mixing glass with ice.  Stir to chill.
  3. Strain into chilled cocktail glass

Cheers!

* Doc Elliott’s Mixology receives no compensation for brands mentioned.




The Wellington

The Wellington

The Wellington

Treaty Oak Distilling is aging their gin in whiskey barrels to create their Waterloo Antique Gin.  This is truly a unique gin.  It has the sweet caramel nose that you would expect from the barrel aging but with the addition of the herbaceous input of gin.  The flavors are citrus, spice and herbs with a finish of charred oak that is long and smooth.   We combined this with Italian vermouth and Amaro.

 

  • 1 1/2 oz. Waterloo Antique GinWellington
  • 1/2 oz. Carpano Antica Vermouth
  • 1/4 oz. Averna Amaro
  • Lemon peel for garnish
  1. Stir the first three ingredients in a mixing glass with ice to chill
  2. Strain into a chilled coup
  3. Express the lemon peel over the drink and float the peel

Cheers!




G-n-Tini

GnTiniI think that Fords Gin cries out for grapefruit.  It so happens that grapefruit is one of the primary flavors in Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s tonic recipe.  His quinine syrup, that you can add to club soda to make tonic water, is simple and takes less than an hour to make.  I thought that including the quinine syrup directly with the drink would make an interesting bitter sweet addition.  I believe I was correct!  Here’s the recipe:

G-n-Tini

  • Fords Gin1 1/2 oz. Fords Gin
  • 1/2 oz. Dolin Sweet Vermouth
  • 1/2 oz. Quinine Syrup – see here
  • Grapefruit peel for garnish
  1. Stir the first three ingredients in a mixing glass with ice to chill
  2. Strain into a chilled coup
  3. Express the grapefruit peel over the drink and float the peel

Cheers!




Manhattan 2.0

For the the bourbon in this cocktail, we tried Basil Hayden and Belle Mead.  Both were excellent.  The bourbon brings flavors of maple, tobacco, smoke and vanilla.  This blends well with the rich, earthy Carpano Antica’s tastes of herbs, spice and slight bitterness.  Tasting this without knowing the ingredients, one could easily miss the sherry.  It intermingles with the Italian Vermouth, smoothing the bitterness and adding to the richness.  Here is the recipe:

Manhattan 2.0

Manhattan 2.0

  • 1 1/2 oz. Bourbon
  • 3/4 oz.  Carpano Antica
  • 1/4 oz. Sherry
  • 1/8 tsp. Grand Marnier
  • 1 dash Angostura Orange  Bitters
  • Garnish: Luxardo Maraschino Cherries and an orange peel
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Add the ingredients, except the garnish, to a mixing glass with ice and stir to chill
  3. Strain into the chilled cocktail glass
  4. Add the cherries, (or place them on a pick), and express the orange peel over the drink and discard.

Cheers!


 




Not-Quite -A-tini

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday

Mixology Monday XCIV is upon us and this month’s theme is “That’s Not a Martini!”  Our host, Nihil Utopia, has hit upon something we really enjoy: messing with gin and fortified wines.  We have two offerings for this round, (We had to pare it down from 6 or 8!!).  First is the G-n-Tini, which, combining gin, dry vermouth and quinine syrup, might also qualify as “That’s Not a Gin and Tonic!”.  For our second we offer The Wellington: barrel aged gin, sweet vermouth and amaro.

GnTini Poster

Fords GinI think that Fords Gin cries out for grapefruit.  It so happens that grapefruit is one of the primary flavors in Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s tonic recipe.  His quinine syrup, that you can add to club soda to make tonic water, is simple and takes less than an hour to make.  I thought that including the quinine syrup directly with the drink would make an interesting bitter sweet addition.  I believe I was correct!  Here’s the recipe:

G-n-Tini

 

GnTini

  • 1 1/2 oz. Fords Gin
  • 1/2 oz. Dolin Sweet Vermouth
  • 1/2 oz. Quinine Syrup – see here
  • Grapefruit peel for garnish
  1. Stir the first three ingredients in a mixing glass with ice to chill
  2. Strain into a chilled coup
  3. Express the grapefruit peel over the drink and float the peel

The Wellington

 

Treaty Oak Distilling is aging their gin in whiskey barrels to create their Waterloo Antique Gin.  This is truly a unique gin.  It has the sweet caramel nose that you would expect from the barrel aging but with the addition of the herbaceous input of gin.  The flavors are citrus, spice and herbs with a finish of charred oak that is long and smooth.   We combined this with Italian vermouth and Amaro.

 

  • 1 1/2 oz. Waterloo Antique GinWellington
  • 1/2 oz. Carpano Antica Vermouth
  • 1/4 oz. Averna Amaro
  • Lemon peel for garnish
  1. Stir the first three ingredients in a mixing glass with ice to chill
  2. Strain into a chilled coup
  3. Express the lemon peel over the drink and float the peel

Cheers!




Vermouth Panache Revisited

Our friends over at Swizzzlestick reintroduced us to the Vermouth Panache for the MxMo XCI – Shims.  A drink first described by Hemingway, it is light, refreshing and low ABV.  I used Carpano Antica and Dolans Dry vermouth.  I also changed the ratio slightly adding more sweet vermouth less dry – more like a 2:1 1/2 ratio rather than 2:1.  Here is the original recipe:Vermouth Panache

  • 2 oz. Dry French Vermouth
  • 1 oz. Sweet Italian Vermouth
  • 1 Dash Angostura Bitters
  • 1 Lemon peel
  1. Combine the first 3 ingredients in a mixing glass with ice and stir to chill
  2. Strain into a chilled double old fashioned with fresh ice
  3. Express the lemon peel and float.

Now for the revisiting part:

I decided to try this substituting Lillet for the dry vermouth.  This I did 1:1 but I think it would be equally good as 2:1 Lillet to Carpano.  I also used Orange Bitters.

LilletBlanc

  • 1 1/2 oz. Lillet
  • 1 1/2 oz. Sweet Italian Vermouth
  • 1 Dash Angostura Orange Bitters
  • 1 Lemon peel
  1. Combine the first 3 ingredients in a mixing glass with ice and stir to chill
  2. Strain into a chilled double old fashioned with fresh ice
  3. Express the lemon peel and float.

You should check out Swizzzlestick, our fellow MxMo’r

Cheers!




The Manhattan

Sazerac is my rye whiskey of choice.  Made at the Buffalo Trace Distillery, it is spicy and sweet with flavors of orange peels, pepper and allspice.  It blends very well with the Italian Vermouth.  Note that this is the same recipe as the Irish Manhattan, just substituting the Irish Whiskey for the rye.

  • Sazerac-Rye-Black2-1-290x2901 ½ oz. rye whiskey
  • ½ oz. sweet vermouth
  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters
  1. Chill a cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and stir with ice
  3. Strain into chilled glass
  4. Garnish with a cherry



Vodka Martini

  • 2 oz. vodka
  • ½ oz. St. Germaine Elderflower Liqueur
  • ½ oz. sweet vermouth
  • dash rhubarb bitters
  1. Chill cocktail glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and stir with ice
  3. Strain into chilled glass



Rosita Cocktail

  • 1 ½ oz. plata tequila
  • ½ oz. sweet vermouth
  • ½ oz. dry vermouth
  • ½ oz. Campari
  • dash of Angostura Bitters
  1. Stir with ice
  2. Strain into an ice filled rocks glass



Negroni

This is  my personal favorite drink.  I doubled down on the bitterness by adding bitters and the flamed orange zest.  I serve it in a double old fashioned with an ice sphere.

  • 1 1/2 oz. Plymouth GinNegroni (2)
  • 1 1/2 oz. Campari
  • 1 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 Dashes Angostura Orange Bitters
  • 2 Dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters
  • Fat Orange Zest
  1. Chill an old fashioned glass with ice and water
  2. Combine all ingredients, except the zest, in a mixing glass and stir with ice
  3. Strain over fresh ice in chilled glass
  4. Flame the fat orange zest over the drink and drop it in.